Remember that CFDs are a leveraged product and can result in the loss of your entire capital. Trading CFDs may not be suitable for you. Please ensure you fully understand the risks involved.

Manage Your Desired Account Leverage

Manage Your Desired Account Leverage
  • Trade with leverage which best suits your trading needs
  • You can trade using high or low leverage
  • Night Premium still applies

At Plus500 you can trade with high or low leverage, depending on the predefined leverage set for each instrument, your 'Total position value' and ‘Equity.' You can control your ‘Equity’ by depositing or withdrawing funds. You can control your 'Total position value' by opening or closing positions.
Your 'Total position value' and 'Equity' can be viewed from the Account Snapshot page which is accessed from the main trading window.

Examples:

If you deposit $100,000 [your equity is $100,000] and buy Natural Gas worth $100,000, then you are trading with a leverage of 1 [no leverage]. Please note you would still pay the night premium for any positions held overnight.

If you deposit $20,000 [your equity is $20,000] to Plus500 and buy Natural Gas worth $200,000, then you are trading with a leverage of 10. As before, the night premium pays for any positions held overnight.

Set 'Close at Profit' [Limit] or 'Close at Loss' [Stop loss] price levels

Set 'Close at Profit' [Limit] or 'Close at Loss' [Stop loss] price levels
  • Free of charge
  • Helps setting predefined limits

A Stop loss can be added to your trades either before opening them or by editing an open position. Set the price level your position is to close if the market turns against you. A basic stop loss does not guarantee your position will close at the exact price level you specify. If the market price suddenly gaps down or up, beyond your stop level, it is possible your position will be closed at a worse price level than you set. This is known as 'slippage'.

Example:

Google trades at $1194 - $1196 (Sell/Buy)
You buy 10 shares of Google.
You want to limit your loss to $1000 [occasionally you might lose more because of slippage]
You place a 'Close at Loss' [Stop loss] price of $1096
Google 'gaps down' directly to $1094 and then to $1080.
Your position will be closed at $1094.
Your loss is: 10*(1196 - 1094) = $1020

Guaranteed Stop

Guaranteed Stop
  • Extra spread applies
  • Limits on your risk
  • Know in advance your maximum possible loss

Attaching a guaranteed stop to your trade puts an absolute limit on the potential loss. Even if the market price gaps suddenly, your position will be closed out at exactly the price specified, with no risk of slippage.
A 'Guaranteed stop' is available for specified instruments only. If an instrument supports a 'Guaranteed Stop', a check box will be clearly visible.
'Guaranteed Stop' details:
They can only be placed on a new trade and cannot be added to an existing position. A Guaranteed Stop can be activated/edited only when the instrument is available and is trading. Once it is active, it cannot be removed, only the stop price can be changed.
The spread adjustment charge for a 'Guaranteed Stop' is non-refundable once activated and will be displayed before approval.
Note that a Guaranteed Stop price has to be in a certain distance from the current trading price of the instrument.

Example:

Google SELL/BUY = $498/$500.
You buy 10 shares of Google, let’s say the Guaranteed Stop spread adjustment is $10.
You place a guaranteed stop at $450.
Google drops to $400, you are guaranteed to exit the position at $450 and not $400.

With a guaranteed stop on 10 shares: P&L = $4500 - $5000 - $10 [guaranteed stop spread adjustment] = -$510
Without a guaranteed stop: P&L = $4000 - $5000 = -$1000

Price Alerts

Price Alerts
  • Free of charge
  • Used when the market is making key moves but keeps your position open
  • Get an email, SMS or push notification

Set price alerts to notify when the market reaches a specified buy or sell price. Unlike a stop, a price alert keeps your position open, so you can decide what action to take as the market moves.
In the Instrument list and Instrument Details screen there is a bell icon - clicking the bell will open a ‘Price Alert’ screen.

Example:

Oil is trading at $105 a barrel. You think that if Oil will trade at $80 there is an opportunity.
You set a price alert for Oil at $80.
Oil dives to $78.
You get an email and SMS letting you know the new price of Oil.

Trailing Stop - automatically protect a position's downside while locking in the upside.

Trailing Stop - automatically protect a position's downside while locking in the upside.
  • Free of charge
  • Lock in your profits
  • Automatically amends the 'stop price'
  • Not guaranteed

A trailing stop is similar to a price limit, as both are designed to protect your profit. Place a trailing stop when you open your trade and it will move with your profit. If the market turns, your position will close out at your trailing stop’s new level, and not the level you originally placed it at.
Using a trailing stop means you lock in profits while limiting your 'downside' risk, without the need to manually monitor your position and adjust your stop price.

Example:

Yahoo is trading at $45.51/$45.73 (Sell/Buy)
You enter a market order with a Trailing Stop of 50 pips = $0.5 = (-1.1%) to buy 100 Yahoo shares
You buy 100 Yahoo shares at $45.73
Therefore, the initial stop loss will kick in when Yahoo sells at $45.01. ($45.51 – $0.5)
The Yahoo price starts to rise quickly and reach $47.60 (the new Stop Price trails the change to $47.10)
Then the Yahoo price continues to rise and reach $49.75 (the new Stop Price again trails the change to $49.25)
The Yahoo price starts to move against you and reaches $42.51.[Please note that a Trailing Stop can go against you if the market “gaps down” from $47.60 directly to $40.]
As you had a trailing Stop Price set at $49.25, Plus500 executes the Stop Loss at this figure.
Profit Summary: 100* ($49.25–$45.73) = $352.